USMS Summer Fitness Challenge is on Now!

Contributed by Emily Cook, GBM, NELMSC Fitness & ALTS Coordinator

Ah, summer in New England! A time for swimming outside and getting the most we can out of every drop of sunshine. What better time to be recognized for your swims and to support swim lessons for adults?

USMS and Smarty Pants Vitamins are hosting the 2019 Summer Fitness Challenge July 15-31. The challenge is a 2-kilometer swim that can be done in any manner desired: straight through, as a member of a relay, with fins, and even during practice times or open water swims!

Fitness Challenge Rules:       

  1. No grumpy pants…

  2. Register.

  3. Swim!

Event proceeds support the USMS Swimming Saves Lives Foundation, a critical force in providing life-saving swim lessons for adults.

There is even a non-USMS member option so everyone can participate! New England was one of the highest performing LMSCs in the last Fitness Challenge. Let’s show the country we can do it again!

Register online for the Summer Fitness Challenge now through July 31st.

Swim Spots We Love: Misquamicut State Beach in Westerly, RI

Is there an open water swim spot you love? Tell us about it!

Contributed by Bridget M.M. Simpson, Adirondack Masters

WESTERLY, RI — The first time I saw the ocean was at Misquamicut State Beach when I was a little girl. About ten years ago, I started making the trek back from northern New York state each summer with my kids. The bathhouse is new and features a daughter-approved play area, there is plenty of sandy beach, and the dune has been left to grow sea grasses.

Bridget Simpson surveys her domain at Misquamicut State Beach (photo by Quinn Simpson)

Bridget Simpson surveys her domain at Misquamicut State Beach (photo by Quinn Simpson)

The beach: The beach features lifeguards, coin-operated hot showers, composting toilets, and a concession stand. A Rhode Island seasonal beach parking pass is well worth it to access all of the state’s beaches and their well-maintained facilities. The Misquamicut lot will fill on a weekend morning—I once went to Mass on a Sunday morning and had to wait until about mid-afternoon to park. After hours, the parking lot is open at no charge and the on-beach cold showers may still be working.

Where to swim: I swim between Paddy’s Beach Bar and the Westerly Town Beach, just past the breakers. The swim area is marked by widely spaced buoys far from shore. I have seen a few boats come close to the buoy limits, but I swim about midway between beach and buoy line. I feel safe, but do pay attention. Past Misquamicut, the beaches are guarded, and I may swim past a few more along Atlantic Avenue this summer.

Water conditions: The guards like my bright tow buoy. I swim in deep water, but I can see the ripples in the sand below me. It is brisk—usually in the mid-to-high 60s—but last summer had days in the low-to-mid 70s. There are occasionally rip currents; I once swam for about a half hour with no progress. It was a good workout, and the guards could tell I was not in distress.

Wildlife: Occasionally, seaweed floats on the water in patches or clouds, and last summer there were a few days in August with periodic moon-jellies. Like small, clear jellybeans, they made the water feel like tapioca. While weird, they only caused a problem when some got stuck in my suit and made me itch. Newer, snugger suits had kept them out. In a race or event, I’d have kept going, but since this was a vacation swim, I swapped my goggles for the sunglasses in my tow float and enjoyed a walk on the beach instead.

The Simpson children enjoy the sandy beach

The Simpson children enjoy the sandy beach

Refueling: My tow float can hold a sundress (in a Ziplock bag), a small snack, and water. I can take a break along the way, and maybe go for clam cakes or a bowl of chowder from Two Little Fish, a great place for lunch just across Atlantic Avenue from the east end of Misquamicut. The dry bag closure can clip around the belt, so I don't have to carry it. Ever so stylish!

Where to stay: Sometimes I make three trips to Misquamicut during the summer. I tent at nearby Burlingame Campgrounds in Charlestown. Sites will book solid on a weekend or holiday, but I risk a walk-in space on weeknights for spur-of-the-moment trips. I check email and fill my cooler on my way to the beach. There are lovely motels and hotels in the area, but I like my cot and tent.

How to join me: I am a solo swimmer, but would be happy to meet up with swimmers when I am in the area. Some trips last a few days, but I have been known to drive down, sleep the night, swim all day, and get back in the car to drive home. Contact Bridget here.

Is there an open water swim spot you love? Tell us about it!

MBCC's Against The Tide Event is a Hidden Gem

HOPKINTON, MA — On June 15, I participated once again in the Massachusetts Breast Cancer Coalition’s Against the Tide 1-mile open water swim at Hopkinton State Park.

I have to admit that as I write this article, I am bewildered by how few of my fellow masters swimmers opt to participate in this race. I always thought MBCC ran a good event. After helping them with some suggestions over the years, I now think they run a GREAT event. Here are just a few things that make this race worthwhile:

Al Prescott is recognized by MBCC for his efforts in helping the race director.

Al Prescott is recognized by MBCC for his efforts in helping the race director.

  • They offer a competitive 1-mile race, one loop around an island, that is the SAME distance every year.

  • They offer a completely separate non-competitive race for beginners and folks who just want to take it easy or try it out.

  • You get free access to the Hopkinton State Park and can stay all day.

  • They have free HOT breakfast for EVERYONE.

  • They offer events for the whole family including running races, a paddle board race, a kayak race, and more.

  • I got a free 15-minute massage after the race.

  • Your entry fee helps support research and prevention of a deadly disease.

If you are looking for a good early—but not too early—season event, come to Hopkinton next year and try to knock me out of the Top 10. Win or lose, I’ll meet you for a hot egg and cheese sandwich after the race.
— “Big” Al Prescott, NEM-MAMA, NELMSC Treasurer
Al Prescott, Jocelyn Noakes, and Frank Reinhold celebrate their efforts in the 1-mile swim

Al Prescott, Jocelyn Noakes, and Frank Reinhold celebrate their efforts in the 1-mile swim

Despite this, the race director has confided in me confusion. Years ago, it was normal to get 60 to 100 people in the swim race. Now the numbers are in the 30s. While I plan to do this race into the foreseeable future, that future looks murky. I'm not sure what more the race director can do to promote this race, and I have promised to help them brainstorm.

In the meantime, let me try this: I have won my age group and finished in the top 10 each time I have done this race. This year, I challenged one of my teammates to compete with me. She beat me and won her age group. So to the rest of New England: if you are looking for a good early—but not too early—season event, come to Hopkinton next year and try to knock me out of the Top 10. Win or lose, I'll meet you for a hot egg and cheese sandwich after the race.

- “Big” Al Prescott, NEM-MAMA, NELMSC Treasurer

MBCC will host their second event of the summer, Against the Tide - Brewster, on August 17 at Nickerson State Park.

Sixteen Athletes Represent New England at the 2019 Canadian Masters Swimming Championships

Contributed by Sue Jensen, Officials Chair, NEM-CRM

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MONTRÉAL, CANADA — The swimming pool in the complexe sportif Claude-Robillard, built for the 1976 Summer Olympics water polo competitions, was the setting for this year’s Canadian Masters Swimming Championships from May 24-26. A record 740 swimmers gathered together for the 40th anniversary of this annual meet. Swimmers came from all ten provinces of Canada and a handful of countries from around the world, including Australia, Bermuda, Great Britain, and Slovakia. Sixty swimmers hailed from the United States, with sixteen coming from New England.

The Americans swam well, winning 108 gold medals and placing second overall ahead of CAMO Natation, the provincial home team from Québec. The New England team included: Fiona Atkinson, Christina Baudis, Dave Bright, Guy Davis, Laura Delorey, Beth Estel, David Graham, Sue Jensen, Frankin Mansilla, Karen Mareb, Janet McDonough, Nic Ohman, Tom Phillips, Kathy Slifer, Marilyn Soraghan, and Mindy Williams

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Most of Team New England drove through Vermont and across the U.S.-Canada border, passports in hand, to attend the three-day French-speaking meet. Not only was this an occasion for New Englanders to practice their French, but with the New England short course meters season having ended in December at the WPI meet, it was a welcome out-of-season opportunity to compete in short course meters. 

Highlight swims by New Englanders include:

  • Dave Bright (age 66) won the 200 IM, 400 IM, and 200 backstroke and broke New England records in 400 freestyle, 400 IM, and 200 backstroke.

  • Mindy Williams (age 38) won the 1500 freestyle while setting a New England record and logging a personal best time by 21 seconds.

  • Karen Mareb (age 60) won gold in all her breaststroke events and the 100 freestyle.

  • Tom Phillips (age 45) won the 50 freestyle and swam a lifetime best time of 24.76.

  • Marilyn Soraghan and Laura Delorey made it to the finals of the age 50+ bonus 25-meter freestyle race (amid much fanfare!).

  • The quartet of Janet McDonough, Beth Estel, Sue Jensen, and Karen Mareb (age group 240-279) took first place and broke the New England record in both the 200 and 400 medley relays and are now ranked 2nd (400m) and 3rd (200m) on FINA’s World Masters Top Ten List.

The 41st Canadian Masters Championship will be held in Toronto, Ontario in June 2020. 

Swim Strong: Multiphase Dryland Series for Masters Swimmers, Phase II

 

Contributed by Stacy Sweetser, ASCA & USMS Level II, SweetWater Swim Studio & Chris Brown, CSCS, CCET, Endurafit Training and Rehab

Welcome back to the Swim Strong Series. This is the second phase of a progressive dryland training sequence meant to build athleticism that compliments the demands of moving forward through the water efficiently and powerfully. Dryland training, at the pool and at home, is a valuable addition to any swimmer’s routine regardless of age or fitness level. Click here to read Phase I of the Swim Strong Series.

The goal of this series is to increase a swimmer’s range of motion while building strength and mobility. This fundamental movement pattern work aids in injury prevention, tightens connective tissue, and improves swim mechanics and strength. Each phase builds upon the previous phase. The early phases will focus on range of motion, mobility and stability, then progress into strength and resistance exercises.

Use the following Phase II exercise routine as your dynamic warm up before each swim, at home, or before other activities. Allow 3-5 minutes 3x/week. Feel free to alternate days while revisiting exercises from Phase I. If on the pool deck, use a kickboard as a cushion for your knees, ankles, and forearms when appropriate.

A dynamic warm up increases blood circulation and fires up muscles soon to be engaged in the water. Think, “RAMP Up!” before you start up. (RAMP = Range of motion, Activation, Muscle Pliability.)

Do not force movements in this routine and build repetitions and time in exercises gradually.


Wall Slides

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Why do it? Wall slides are a great drill to improve shoulder extension and lat activation.

How to do it well: Keeping the spine neutral, place the elbow, forearm and wrist on the wall with the elbow at shoulder height. Push the hands toward the ceiling, keeping the elbow and forearm in contact with the wall, while pulling the shoulder blades down as depicted by the green arrows. Complete 8-10 repetitions.

Common mistakes: The most common mistakes are rounding the spine, pulling the elbows away from the wall on extension, and shrugging the shoulders as depicted by the red arrows.

Chest Opener

Why do it? The chest opener is a great way to activate the posterior deltoid and rhomboids (think upper back) while stretching the pecs.

How to do it well: In a half kneeling position and with a neutral spine, place the hands around the ears with the elbows out to the side. Pull the elbows back while squeezing the shoulder blades together and exhaling. Complete 6-8 repetitions.

Common mistakes: The most common mistakes are starting with the elbows too far forward with a rounded spine and head tilted forward, arching the back during the pull back motion, and pointing the toes on the rear foot.

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T-Spine Rotations

Why do it? T-Spine Rotations are a great drill to provide mobility through the mid-back (thoracic spine).

How to do it well: In a half kneeling position, place the hands around the ears with the elbows out to the side (similar to the starting position of the chest openers). Take a deep breath in then exhale hard as you rotate over the front leg. Inhale and return to the starting position. Complete 6-8 repetitions.

Common mistakes: The most common mistakes are rounding the spine throughout the range of motion, not pulling the elbows back to engage the upper back, dropping the chin, and pointing the rear toes.

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Ankle Mobs

Why do it? The Ankle Mobs (or Ankle Mobility) drill is one of our favorites for developing ankle mobility and flexibility in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (calf muscles).

How to do it well: Starting in the half kneeling position with the spine in neutral and the front foot slightly behind the front knee, place the hands on top of the knee. Shift your weight forward as you press the knee past the front toes while keeping the front heel in contact with the floor. Return to starting position. Complete 10-12 repetitions.

Common mistakes: The most common mistakes are extending the spine, starting with the front foot too far forward, and allowing the front heel to lose contact with the floor.

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Around the World

Why do it? The Around the World drill is a great movement to improve range of motion and flexibility of the rotator cuff.

How to do it well: Using a strap or a towel long enough to allow you to go through the range of motion, grab the end of the strap/towel with the palms facing down and the arms fully extended. Bring one arm overhead with the other out to the side to form a triangle. Bring both arms behind, then continue the motion to the other side. Repeat from the opposite side. Complete 4-6 repetitions.

Common mistakes: The most common mistakes are standing with the back extended (arched), using a strap or towel that is too short, and bending the elbows.

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Learn more about Stacy & Chris:

Stacy Sweetser, ASCA & USMS Level II Coach: SweetWater Swim Studio | Facebook | Instagram
Chris Brown, CSCS, CCET: Endurafit Training and Rehab | Facebook | Instagram

Swim spots we love: Jenness State Beach in Rye, NH

Is there an open water swim spot you love? Tell us about it!

Contributed by Guy Davis, GBM & NELMSC Vice-Chair

RYE, NH — I'm very lucky to live within an easy drive to Rye, NH, and have been swimming at Jenness State Beach—also known as Rye Beach—for the last decade. The north section is also known as Cable Beach (confusing, huh?) because it is the place where one of the the first trans-Atlantic communications cables came ashore in 1874. It's a wonderful venue for open water swimming, but of course as an ocean venue, we need to respect and understand the weather, surf and other conditions and take the appropriate safety precautions. 

Getting there: The beach is about a mile long, with the State Beach parking lot at around the midpoint. This area becomes busy during the summer so my pod usually swims from the north end of the beach, where there is access to the beach and plenty of street parking even during busy weekends, though a short walk might be required on those days. Take care to respect the Rye parking notices and rules; your car wheels must be outside the white lines (completely off the road) to avoid a ticket.

The beach: The beach is protected by rocky headlands at either end but, other than a few rocks close to the state parking lot which are well-submerged except at low tide, generally hazard-free. It is lifeguarded during the summer. The water is usually very clean but sometimes seaweed piles up at one end of the beach so we occasionally need to wade or swim through some of it to the clean water.

Water temperature: The water is cool or cold throughout the summer and can vary widely from day to day depending on wind conditions. When there are consistently strong offshore winds the water can drop into the 50s even at the height of summer and the temperature rarely exceeds the mid 60s. A good proxy for the temperature you can expect is the reading at NOAA's Wells buoy.

Most of our pod swims in a wetsuit throughout the season, but we have a few hardy “channel” type swimmers who swim skins for most or all of the year.

Surf: Rye Beach is a popular surf spot. The beach conditions can be checked on the surf cam of the local surf shop. Surf conditions vary a great deal from dead calm to over head-high, so checking ahead is a good idea. When surf is up, we make sure to swim outside the surf line and away from the surfers for calmer water and to avoid any risk of collision. On these days, particular care needs to be taken when swimming out through the surf or back into the beach. Getting through the surf can be challenging, so be sure to swim within your experience and capabilities. Although uncommon at Rye, riptides are always a consideration in ocean beach swimming, so take care to understand these and other hazards of ocean swimming. Consulting with the lifeguards and letting them know of your swim plans is always a good idea when swimming in a less familiar venue.

Boats: Boat presence is very unusual, but on calm days a couple of fishing boats may approach the shore, usually at the ends of the beach.

Wildlife: There has never been a recorded “big fish” incident on NH beaches and I have never heard of any jellyfish problems from local swimmers.

When we swim: We swim fairly regularly on Saturday and Sunday mornings at about 7am throughout the summer. Come join us! (If you need more information, check out the Great Bay Masters group on Facebook.)

Please note: These swims are informal, unsanctioned, and at your own risk.

Is there an open water swim spot you love? Tell us about it!

Call Me Coach: USMS Level 1 & 2 Coach Certification Review

Contributed by Joan Hudak, NEM-CRM

Over 100 USMS members took part in U.S. Masters Swimming’s Boston-area education weekend April 6-7. Offerings included USMS Level 1 & 2 Coach Certification, USMS Level 3 Coach Certification, USMS Adult Learn-to-Swim (ALTS) Instructor Certification, USMS Clinic Course for Coaches, and a USMS Stroke Clinic for swimmers that also served as practical experience for the Clinic Course participants. Read on for newly certified coach Joan Hudak’s perspective on the Level 1 & 2 Coach Certification experience.

MARLBOROUGH, MA — I fell in love with swimming at age six when my mom signed me up for a small summer league with an irregularly-sized pool. I raced through childhood, high school, and college, and by the end of my senior year I was beyond ready for a break. After some time off, some triathlons, and a lot of solo training, I joined U.S Masters Swimming at age 28.

The Level 1 & 2 Coach Certification course sold out, with 40 students taking part.

The Level 1 & 2 Coach Certification course sold out, with 40 students taking part.

At Masters practice, one of the first things I noticed was how much more passionate about the sport my teammates were than I remembered being when I was younger. When I raced as a kid, I felt like I was partly swimming for someone else: for my parents, for my coaches, for my teammates. Now, I saw how excited my teammates were to swim for themselves. Many didn’t have the benefit of learning at a young age like I did, and they were eager to try new techniques and learn new strokes. Techniques I found intuitive were completely unknown to some of the newer swimmers, and the more I trained with them, the more I wanted to share my knowledge and experience.

This realization drove me to sign up for the USMS Level 1 & 2 Coaching Certification class. I completed the short reading assignment in advance, but as a kinesthetic learner I wasn’t quite sure how a day in a classroom would translate to the pool deck. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the course was run in a workshop-type setting, with frequent breaks and practical exercises to actively engage us in what we were learning.

After a quick round of introductions, it was clear that the 40 participants came from vastly different backgrounds, and that many were still relatively new to the sport. While some of the students were actively coaching for their respective USMS or USAT programs, others, myself included, were there for the love of swimming and desire to begin coaching following the class. 

Coaches got hands-on experience during the in-water portion of the Clinic Course for Coaches while swimmers got a USMS Stroke clinic

Coaches got hands-on experience during the in-water portion of the Clinic Course for Coaches while swimmers got a USMS Stroke clinic

The day began with a brief review of our 15-page reading assignment: a history of United States Masters Swimming, the values and structure of the organization, and basic business practices for managing a safe, inclusive USMS club. We then dove (pun intended) into some coaching techniques and strategies for teaching adult learners – explaining the what, why, and how of each drill or set will ultimately help improve their swimming the most. We also spent a large portion of the class discussing the different types of swimmers that may join a Masters program, and some of the benefits or challenges they may face there. 

We then moved onto some practical applications, such as strategies for and benefits of writing workouts of differing intensities (aerobic, anaerobic, VO2 Max, test sets) and setting SMART goals with your athletes. We spent time learning the basics of teaching stroke technique and discussed the necessity of being flexible in teaching, working around injuries, tips for correcting poor technique, and some drills for each of the four strokes (five, when you include the streamline!), turns, and starts. We watched several videos (above and underwater) of Masters swimmers and analyzed their technique and what they may need to work on. 

Newly minted Level 3 Masters Coaches Jennifer Passafiume and Pamela Crandall with USMS COO Bill Brenner

Newly minted Level 3 Masters Coaches Jennifer Passafiume and Pamela Crandall with USMS COO Bill Brenner

The class ended with a quick assessment and we received our Level 1 and 2 certificates. Not only did I leave feeling confident to work with my own athletes, but I also felt like my own swimming benefitted from the techniques we discussed. I left wanting to try the new drills, work on my walls, and practice my weaker strokes. Overall, I was pleased with how much I gained from a single day in the classroom, and would highly recommend taking the course if you have the opportunity.

Swim Strong: Multiphase Dryland Series for Masters Swimmers, Phase I

Swim Strong: Multiphase Dryland Series for Masters Swimmers, Phase I

Swimming strong is about building athleticism that compliments the demands of moving through the water efficiently and powerfully. Dryland training, at the pool and at home, is a valuable addition to any swimmer’s routine regardless of age or fitness level. The goal of this series is to increase the swimmer’s range of motion while building strength and mobility. This fundamental movement pattern work aids in injury prevention, tightens connective tissue, and improves swim mechanics and strength.

The Swim Strong Series will present dryland exercises in progressive phases. Each phase builds upon the previous phase. The early phases will focus on range of motion, mobility and stability then progress into strength and resistive exercises.  Phase I teaches the following exercises: Posture Row, Supported Hip Hinge, Toe Sits, Heel Sits, and Plank.

College Club Swimming Makes Waves

Contributed by Jason Weis, NELMSC College Club Swimming Liaison

ATLANTA, GA — Over President’s Day weekend this February, I traveled to Atlanta, GA to participate in the third annual College Club Swimming Summit. College Club Swimming (CCS) is a new governing body that was founded with the help of U.S. Masters Swimming. Now in its second year, CCS serves as a bridge between high school swimmers who didn’t or couldn’t swim on a varsity team in college and U.S. Masters Swimming.

Much like USMS, CCS is led by an Advisory Board consisting of volunteers who are elected to two-year terms and serve as leadership on their local teams. Although CCS is backed by USMS, it is financially independent and almost entirely student-run, with just a small number of CCS alumni and USMS members sitting on the Advisory Board. USMS helps provide infrastructure for CCS to keep swimmers in the sport and aims to transition CCS members to USMS after graduation.

College Club Swimming Summit participants in Atlanta

College Club Swimming Summit participants in Atlanta

This past year, CCS launched a wide variety of enhancements for its members. A new USMS-CCS bridge membership allows CCS members to swim in USMS sanctioned and recognized events while continuing to represent their CCS team in a new College Club Swimming LMSC. Additionally, CCS hosted its first Regional Championship series, with successful meets hosted at Rutgers University in the Northern region and Nova Southeastern in the Southern Region. CCS acquired its first sponsor in FINIS, the title sponsor for the CCS’s second national championship meet. Held at the Ohio State University from March 29-31, the 2019 FINIS College Club National Championships featured online meet entry through Club Assistant and drew 1,863 athletes from around the country. Online meet entry for all CCS meets is scheduled to become available to CCS Clubs in Fall 2019.

Georgia Tech was the 2019 FINIS College Club Swimming National Champion pc: @collegeclubswimming

Georgia Tech was the 2019 FINIS College Club Swimming National Champion pc: @collegeclubswimming

At the Summit, Advisory Board members discussed a wide variety of topics, including best practices for clubs, inclusion and diversity within CCS, and amended rules of the governing handbook. For the first time, all three committees of the Advisory Board (Club Development, Rules, and Competition) met separately to discuss specific challenges and issues within CCS. It was an incredibly productive summit, resulting in improved organization and structure within the Advisory Board while promoting a low barrier of entry to CCS with the goal of maximizing CCS membership.

In the New England area, there are currently about 10 CCS-affiliated clubs, including Harvard, Northeastern, UMASS, UVM, URI, CCRI, Brown, and UCONN, with several more intending to join for the 2019-2020 season.

Jason is currently serving as an alumni-advisor to the CCS Advisory Board and is the chair of the CCS Rules committee. If you’d like more information about CCS, want to register a team, or have other questions, please contact him.

NELMSC Announces Class of 2019 Hall of Fame Inductees

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Contact: Tracy Grilli

(603) 490-3484

NEW ENGLAND LOCAL MASTERS SWIMMING COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES CLASS OF 2019 HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

BOSTON, March 8, 2019 — The Board of Directors of the New England Local Masters Swimming Committee (NELMSC) is pleased to announce the NELMSC Hall of Fame induction class of 2019. A brief induction ceremony will take place Saturday afternoon, March 23rd, during the NELMSC Short Course Yards Championship Meet at Harvard University’s Blodgett Pool.

The Pool Performance category recognizes members based on outstanding swimming accomplishments achieved as a member of the New England LMSC. 

The Pool Performance class to be inducted in 2019 includes:

  • Michael Ross (MESC)

  • Greg Shaw (NEM)

  • Diann Uustal (NEM)

  • Jacki Hirsty (NEM)

  • Ronnie Kamphausen (MESC)

  • Dan Rogacki (NEM)

The Contributor category honors volunteers who have made significant contributions to Masters Swimming in the NELMSC. This year’s inductees are “Trailblazers” from the 1970s and 1980s who helped build our first three Masters Swimming clubs: New England Masters, Vermont Masters, and Maine Masters.  

The Contributor class to be inducted in 2019 includes:

  • Carol Limanek (VERM)

  • Sandy Potholm (MESC)

  • Henry Southall (VERM)

  • Dennis Willmott (VERM)

  • John Woods (MESC)

  • Enid Uhrich (NEM)

  • Debbie Alsofrom (VERM)

  • Jean (Hotchkiss) Archibald (VERM)

  • Sharon (Forney) Battistini (MESC)

  • Joyce Brown (MESC)

  • Jim Edwards (NEM)

  • George Erswell (MESC)

  • Ted Haartz (NEM)

The NELMSC Hall of Fame was formed in 2010 by the NELMSC Board of Directors. The first class was inducted in June 2011 for pool performance. Those inductees were Fred Schlicher, Petey Smith, Clara Walker and Win Wilson. This was the first (and only) induction class until this year.    

NELMSC Hall of Fame honorees occupy a special place in Masters Swimming. We proudly recognize and record their achievements for Masters swimmers yet to come. Congratulations to all! 

About USMS & NELMSC

U.S. Masters Swimming (USMS) is a membership-operated nonprofit headquartered in Sarasota, Florida. Founded in 1970, USMS is the premier resource for adult aquatic fitness in the United States. Its mission is to promote health, wellness, fitness and competition for adults through swimming. The New England Local Masters Swimming Committee (NELMSC) is a volunteer-run, nonprofit subsidiary of USMS that serves as the regional governing body for USMS-registered clubs, workout groups, coaches and swimmers in Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The NELMSC Board of Directors consists of elected officers and appointed swimming club representatives.

Downloadable announcement